BrandBliss – Facts to know

Millions of websites can be revealed by a fast search with Google, Yahoo! or any of the search engines, most of which were created with a focus on publishing content about a single company or product, with little thought on how realistic the website actually is or what the website can do. Have a look at BrandBliss for more info on this.

Wants vs Needs

It is important to differentiate between needs and desires and to concentrate on functionality, which is really necessary to achieve clear marketing objectives.

The implementation of a website strategy should not only be limited to achieving the objectives of your website, but should also be part of your overall marketing plan.

Just about every organisation has a web presence today. However, apart from providing basic company details and an e-mail form, most websites are mostly viewed as a marketing afterthought without a clear reason for the website.

To help support the overall marketing strategy, the web presence can be seen as an interactive extension of an organisation and a marketing tool.

Setting goals

In designing your internet plan, the first step is to list all the unique tasks that you want your website to perform. In addition to supplying your company with potential customer details, what should your website “do”?

Should you sell e-commerce services? Should it act as a lead source on your website? Should you distribute data or provide better customer service to your customers? Should you hire online clients or survey clients? Or do you sell and advertise simply?

Websites also appear to become a kind of “Swiss Army Knife” online that does a number of different things for various audiences. The truth is that many visitors to your site visit just a few sites, and when they encounter massive, complicated information portals, they may easily get frustrated.

Creating a Priority List

Prioritize the list into three sections as you make a list of what you want the website to achieve: 1) main, “must achieve” goals, 2) secondary, “it would be great if …” and 3) back burner, “if we had to delay this, it wouldn’t affect us.”

Keep in mind the one overwhelming justification for getting a web presence in the first place when grouping your goals, and equate it to each of your individual goals when you prioritise them.

Compare these targets with what is currently going on with your current site and your marketing and advertisement strategy after specifically deciding what your specified website targets should be.

Based on site statistics, customer and employee reviews or surveys, this exercise will allow you to see what the difference is between what you want or need to achieve and what’s actually happening.

Separating needs and wishes

In building an efficient internet strategy, the final move is to distinguish wants from needs. You’ve seen “cool” capabilities elsewhere on the Internet is simple to like, but it can be difficult to decide whether such features would really benefit your business marketing effort.

Do you really need your website to have a chat room or a message board? The “tech” feel of Flash websites can be slick, but are they worth the extra cost?

Maybe it’s really more relevant for you to know who’s using your website and how much they come back for more details, or whether or not your print ads and online marketing strategies are really getting you new customers.